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Strength of Polar Covalent Bond

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What is a Polar Covalent Bond?

A polar covalent bond is one of the covalent bond types. Covalent bond occurs between the two non-metal atoms by the use of the common electrons. There are two types of the covalent bond; polar and non-polar bond. Polar bond has no electron exchange between atoms; the electrons in the last orbits are used commonly. Molecule that occurs at the result of the polar covalent bond is called as compound molecule. The electronegativity of two atoms is different from each other and so the covalent bonds formed by these two atoms do not share the common electron equally. The more electronegative atom attracts this pair of electrons and thus the polar covalent bond is formed.

Polar Covalent Bond
Polar Covalent Bond

Polar Bond Strenght

In a Polar Covalent Bond; as vectorial the net force differs from the zero and different kinds of atoms comes together. If we compare the strengths of the bonds; the polar bond strength is equal to the power of the non-polar bonds. In a different possibility, the polar bond strength is more than the non-polar bond strength. Non-polar bonds are not stronger than the polar bonds. An atom core attracts the electrons pairs to itself and it needs a power for doing this. We can say that this strength is called as electronegativity. The shared electrons may not spend the same amount of time between the atoms. While electrons are found more around an atom, they may spend less time around the others. The most important reason for this situation is electronegativity. The atoms are different electronegativity so the attraction of electrons will be different. Besides, the size of the atomic diameter can be evaluated as one of the other factors.

Polar Covalent Bond
Polar Covalent Bond

How to Separate Polar and Non-Polar Molecules?

In order to understand whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, we must look at the atoms form that molecule and the bonds between the atoms. Polarity is a concept related to the charges. When we look at a molecule, one end of the molecule is positive and the other end of the molecule is negative. We can see these marks. Although the charge of the molecule is neutral in total, this situation tells us that electrons do not move equally between the atoms. So, the molecule partly brings about the plus and minus polarization. If there is no difference in the atoms’ electronegativity we cannot say the bond will be polar bond between these atoms because this means they are same! This is the non-polar bond due to its mono-atomic molecular characteristic. There is a balance between them so their mutual electrons spend equally times between both atoms.

Polar Covalent Bond
Polar Covalent Bond

Polar Bond Example

The most known polar bond example is water! (H2O) In the last orbitals of the Hydrogen and Oxygen molecules which form water, the electrons are commonly used and so this bond is called as Polar Covalent Bond.

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